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Exercise 3 Managing Waste

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For IGCSE ESL Exercise 3 Managing Waste for the Core Paper, you have to read an article and make brief notes under supplied headings.

landfill, managing waste

This IGCSE ESL Exercise 3 about managing waste is in a computer-based version which is different in format from the paper-based version of the IGCSE ESL Examination.

IGCSE ESL Exercise 3 Managing Waste

Read the article.  Write words under the different headings.

Good morning to you all. It’s nice to be here today to talk to you about the vital need to manage our waste in a better way.

Did you know that about 73% of household waste in this city is landfilled, buried in a hole in the ground, usually outside the city? Around 20% is burned, and only 7% is recycled. With landfill sites filling up, and public unease about incineration growing, something will have to change soon.

I wonder if you have ever seen a landfill site? Over one million tons of waste each year is deposited in landfills around this city. This is not a pretty sight. As this figure grows ever larger, we are becoming more concerned about toxic compounds entering the groundwater system. We really don’t know how much damage we are all doing. And because the waste is buried, we think that the problem is buried too. We do, of course, take great care to line the waste collection points with protective material so that there isn't any leakage, but it does happen.

Medical research is now suggesting that there is a small risk of birth defects in the population living within a 2 km radius of a landfill site. It's not proven yet, but this is a worrying suggestion. Those people living near to a site also report occasional unpleasant smells, even though a deodorizer is used on the perimeter of the sites to neutralize smells.

I wonder if you have ever seen a landfill site? Over one million tons of waste each year is deposited in landfills around this city. This is not a pretty sight. As this figure grows ever larger, we are becoming more concerned about toxic compounds entering the groundwater system. We really don’t know how much damage we are all doing. And because the waste is buried, we think that the problem is buried too. We do, of course, take great care to line the waste collection points with protective material so that there isn't any leakage, but it does happen.

Medical research is now suggesting that there is a small risk of birth defects in the population living within a 2 km radius of a landfill site. It's not proven yet, but this is a worrying suggestion. Those people living near to a site also report occasional unpleasant smells, even though a deodorizer is used on the perimeter of the sites to neutralize smells.

It does seem fairly simple for us to address our growing waste mountain. If we could make more people aware of this problem and how relatively easy it is to reduce waste, we could all live in a cleaner environment.

I am hoping that we can encourage people to separate waste for recycling. For example, tax reductions will be given to those who consistently sort their waste out into paper, plastic, glass and green material. We should use financial benefits to encourage more people to take notice of how seriously we regard this problem. We could introduce educational projects for schoolchildren to help raise the profile of waste management among the younger generation. We will also offer more funds to local councils to set up expensive waste recycling facilities, with the aim that within the next fifteen years at least half of our city's waste will be recycled and put to good use.

There is another incentive. which I will use in the next five years if I have to. I think that if the general financial incentives to recycle waste not prove that they can manage their own waste effectively, I will introduce a 'pay as you throw' metered home collection system. Basically, the more harmful to the environment your waste is, the more you will pay to have it removed. Also, if it's shown that you have not sorted your waste efficiently, you will pay more for it to be taken away. These are not measures that I want to introduce, but they will surely get the message across to those people who care little about what they throw away

More exercises available:

When learning vocabulary, especially helpful are exercises that are focussed on a theme or topic as these provide word retention practice so you can be confident to read, write, speak and listen successfully.

Make brief notes related to a piece of text.

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